Raven's Haven
The mission of Raven's Haven is to provide shelter, food and care for
all creatures - be they feathered, furry or human.
We do this in unity with others of like mind and spirit whom have
inspired us to grow, stretch and live to our absolutely fullest.
Chickens represent food. In a time when our society can not always
provide for the young, old, sick and disenfranchised, eggs can make
a difference. We rescue these chickens that otherwise would have
been thrown away. We allow them to live out their lives with the
proper food, water, shelter and protection necessary. In their
gratitude, they produce eggs which feed us. Of course we never
thought we'd be a refuge for chickens, ducks and geese. Then came
Tiny.
The Story of Tiny
Evening Traveler Rescue brought Tiny and her 5 sisters to Raven's
Haven in October 2004. Evening Traveler (ET) had an overflow
situation and asked if we could care for the sick sisters. The sisters
had been brought into the ASPCA San Francisco from a fraternity
party. Apparently the drunken thugs decided that torturing 6 young
hens by plucking their feathers out was some sort of ritualistic right
of passage for them. They 'turned over' the chickens to the ASPCA on
their way to return the empty keg

All of the hens were sick, thin and missing most of their feathers and
part of their beaks (de-beaked). We gave each hen their own 'portable
hen house' (dog crate), food, water and twice daily medication. Each
hen was given a bath (yes - a bath), de-loused and de-wormed. We
lost one of the sick young girls in that first month - but after that the
remaining 5 got stronger and healthier. Tiny was the exception.

As her sisters grew their feathers, graduated to the larger pens and
free ranged in the yard, Tiny seemed unable to turn the corner to gain
her strength back. The 3 now plumb and happy sisters had fully
grown in their feathers and were well enough to move to new homes.
Only Tiny remained - still thin and naked.

We made special meals for our Tiny (called mash), gave her special
thick bedding. Because she had no feathers, no down and no weight,
Tiny was unable to monitor and control her own body temperature so
we gave her special heat lamps and covering blankets for her house.
A staphylococcus infection set into her quill stems as the new feather
growth tried to spring through where the clogged, destroyed feathers
had been. We used special ointments and treatments to clear the
infections - Tiny was a trooper as we poked and pulled to remove the
dead quills.

Summer 2005, Tiny was still with us. She graduated in May of that
year and moved into the hen house with the big girls. No longer is
she completely naked - she has her wing feathers back and many,
many new young feathers all over her body. Tiny will stay with us for
the rest of her natural life.

Why do we rescue? Because after all that Tiny has been through -
even in the darkest months when we were not sure she'd stay with us
- Tiny has never failed to produce an egg a day.
Gratitude is an action, not an idea.
The mission of Raven's Haven is to provide shelter, food and care for
all creatures - be they feathered, furry or human.
We do this in unity with others of like mind and spirit whom have
inspired us to grow, stretch and live to our absolutely fullest.
Chickens represent food. In a time when our society can not always
provide for the young, old, sick and disenfranchised, eggs can make
a difference. We rescue these chickens that otherwise would have
been thrown away. We allow them to live out their lives with the
proper food, water, shelter and protection necessary. In their
gratitude, they produce eggs which feed us. Of course we never
thought we'd be a refuge for chickens, ducks and geese. Then came
Tiny.
The Story of Tiny
Evening Traveler Rescue brought Tiny and her 5 sisters to Raven's
Haven in October 2004. Evening Traveler (ET) had an overflow
situation and asked if we could care for the sick sisters. The sisters
had been brought into the ASPCA San Francisco from a fraternity
party. Apparently the drunken thugs decided that torturing 6 young
hens by plucking their feathers out was some sort of ritualistic right
of passage for them. They 'turned over' the chickens to the ASPCA on
their way to return the empty keg

All of the hens were sick, thin and missing most of their feathers and
part of their beaks (de-beaked). We gave each hen their own 'portable
hen house' (dog crate), food, water and twice daily medication. Each
hen was given a bath (yes - a bath), de-loused and de-wormed. We
lost one of the sick young girls in that first month - but after that the
remaining 5 got stronger and healthier. Tiny was the exception.

As her sisters grew their feathers, graduated to the larger pens and
free ranged in the yard, Tiny seemed unable to turn the corner to gain
her strength back. The 3 now plumb and happy sisters had fully
grown in their feathers and were well enough to move to new homes.
Only Tiny remained - still thin and naked.

We made special meals for our Tiny (called mash), gave her special
thick bedding. Because she had no feathers, no down and no weight,
Tiny was unable to monitor and control her own body temperature so
we gave her special heat lamps and covering blankets for her house.
A staphylococcus infection set into her quill stems as the new feather
growth tried to spring through where the clogged, destroyed feathers
had been. We used special ointments and treatments to clear the
infections - Tiny was a trooper as we poked and pulled to remove the
dead quills.

Summer 2005, Tiny was still with us. She graduated in May of that
year and moved into the hen house with the big girls. No longer is
she completely naked - she has her wing feathers back and many,
many new young feathers all over her body. Tiny will stay with us for
the rest of her natural life.

Why do we rescue? Because after all that Tiny has been through -
even in the darkest months when we were not sure she'd stay with us
- Tiny has never failed to produce an egg a day.